TypeInk

TypeInk

Tumblr Blog of the Teen Department, Peabody Institute Library, Danvers, MA.

hypable:

Laini Taylor discusses her Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy and the latest novel in the series, Dreams of Gods and Monsters, which releases April 8.
Daughter of Smoke & Bone is an incredibly original blend of mythologies; how did you come up with Karou’s world? How long did it take you to solidify all of the elaborate details?
 Thank you! I think that Daughter of Smoke & Bone marked a shift for me in process, or maybe just a natural evolution. With my previous books, I very conscientiously thought out the world in advance. I have notebooks filled with details of my faerie world of Dreamdark, for example. And even before that, when I was a young writer, this was my favorite thing: the world-building. Most of what I called “writing” was actually world-building, with very little actual storytelling happening! But by the time I began Daughter of Smoke & Bone, I’d been experimenting with prompt writing and a freer and more natural approach to writing (which is how I wrote my third book Lips Touch), and its beginnings were in a day of pure free writing. In this case, I let the narrative lead, and interesting clues would crop up—like Brimstone’s wishbone, for example — and I’d examine them, and that was how the world began to develop — as I went along. I never said, at the outset: this is going to be a book about a war between angels and devils. I had no idea. All I knew was this blue-haired girl and this horned “father” and something funky about teeth. Everything else arose organically out of those early seeds.
That said, once it did begin to take shape, I would do bits of research here and there to flesh it out, and a great deal of brainstorming on how to make the most of it.
Read the full interview at Hypable.com

hypable:

Laini Taylor discusses her Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy and the latest novel in the series, Dreams of Gods and Monsters, which releases April 8.

Daughter of Smoke & Bone is an incredibly original blend of mythologies; how did you come up with Karou’s world? How long did it take you to solidify all of the elaborate details?

 Thank you! I think that Daughter of Smoke & Bone marked a shift for me in process, or maybe just a natural evolution. With my previous books, I very conscientiously thought out the world in advance. I have notebooks filled with details of my faerie world of Dreamdark, for example. And even before that, when I was a young writer, this was my favorite thing: the world-building. Most of what I called “writing” was actually world-building, with very little actual storytelling happening! But by the time I began Daughter of Smoke & Bone, I’d been experimenting with prompt writing and a freer and more natural approach to writing (which is how I wrote my third book Lips Touch), and its beginnings were in a day of pure free writing. In this case, I let the narrative lead, and interesting clues would crop up—like Brimstone’s wishbone, for example — and I’d examine them, and that was how the world began to develop — as I went along. I never said, at the outset: this is going to be a book about a war between angels and devils. I had no idea. All I knew was this blue-haired girl and this horned “father” and something funky about teeth. Everything else arose organically out of those early seeds.

That said, once it did begin to take shape, I would do bits of research here and there to flesh it out, and a great deal of brainstorming on how to make the most of it.

Read the full interview at Hypable.com

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Erin McManness
Tumblr: http://miribirdillustrates.tumblr.com/
Anne Frank: the fourth image in a series of 15 Notable Women throughout history who have contributed to social change. This work is a mix of traditional drawing, digital painting, and traditional painting with watercolour and acrylic.
http://erinmcmanness.com/

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Erin McManness

Tumblr: http://miribirdillustrates.tumblr.com/

Anne Frank: the fourth image in a series of 15 Notable Women throughout history who have contributed to social change. This work is a mix of traditional drawing, digital painting, and traditional painting with watercolour and acrylic.

http://erinmcmanness.com/

sachinteng:

30 Day Challenge // Day 25 // Something From Mythology
Though I’m not really a fan of where the story has gone, I’ve always loved the mythology of Doctor Who. Recently the 50th Anniversary depicted a Gallifreyan painting which was a moment in time captured in a picture, literally. So, I was curious about what a Gallifreyan sculpture might look like. I imagined it as a TARDIS in a time where everything is gone and all that’s left of these relics is the box of time they contained and the shell has withered leaving only scrambled, fluctuating moments in time from when it was alive. Almost like it’s dreaming.

sachinteng:

30 Day Challenge // Day 25 // Something From Mythology

Though I’m not really a fan of where the story has gone, I’ve always loved the mythology of Doctor Who. Recently the 50th Anniversary depicted a Gallifreyan painting which was a moment in time captured in a picture, literally. So, I was curious about what a Gallifreyan sculpture might look like. I imagined it as a TARDIS in a time where everything is gone and all that’s left of these relics is the box of time they contained and the shell has withered leaving only scrambled, fluctuating moments in time from when it was alive. Almost like it’s dreaming.